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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)
hostage? >> we would say broken because lots of energy goes into electing these senators individually and then the results are almost nothing. so that's why we would say broken. you could definitely say it's held hostage. but we would say broken because i think regardless of how the deck is, stacks up, republicans, independents and democrats it should not function this way. i mean, we really do believe that. you know, we think our members and working people in this country and most americans would say it's fair. people get elected. at some point, the majority should rule. and that's the way it is in every other democracy in the world. >> but as we talk what's up with harry reid? he does seem to be backing away from the strong reform that you propose. i brought a story from talkingpointsmemo.com. senate majority leader harry reid is voicing support for a set of changes to the current filibuster rules that would fall far short of the more sweeping proposals from people like mr. cohen. what's he -- what's up? >> well, i think part of what's up is he's got four or five mocrats, many of th
's list, held a banquet for some of the newly elected female representatives. house democratic leader nancy pelosi addressed the gathering and the new 113th congress has 20 women now serving in the u.s. senate. this is about 45 minutes. [applause] >> good morning, everyone in. thank you very much. [applause] thank you. this, being a sunday morning, i want to begin by saying that this is the data god has made, that us rejoice and be glad. let us rejoice and be glad that as we gather here in the white house, barack obama is being officially sworn in as the president of the united states. earlier this day, joe biden was sworn in as vice president of the united states. tomorrow, it will be a ceremonial, but today it is official. what a great day. what a great day that we are celebrating emily's list success in strength in numbers. women leading the way. isn't that exciting? 15 more women senators in the united states senate. that is remarkable. in this cycle, we have 80 more democratic women in the house bringing our number to 61 women in the house. [applause] you hear a lot about how peo
. we just spent $3 billion on a presidential election and the president's appointees, most of them he makes now are most likely never to get confirmed, unlikely to get debated, certainly unlikely to get discussed and certainly unlikely to serve. >> you want to end the filibuster. what's behind that? >> senator jeff morgan would make it essential that people talk. this is what the american people want. it would encourage debate, it wouldn't push it away. >> what is your reform asking for, demanding next tuesday? >> four things. one, that the majority leader of the senate can put a bill on the floor for discussion and debate. right now he can't do that unless he has 60 votes to do that. he can't even proceed. >> number two. >> number two, nominations. the president makes nominations. there needs to be a clear way for those nominations to get discussed in a short period of time. not 30 hours of senate time, which is more than a week. but in a short period of time, they get discussed and they get a vote on nominations. number three, a conference committee. the house passes one bill. the s
to do this by e elect trail means. they had to win an election. they weren't confidence about that. there was an incredible a. para military violence that went in to. and the results very uneven. thag how they went out of the union. what proceeded that? when you're in a meeting and everything unanimous. don't you get suspicious? i do. there was a lot of back story to how thigh pulled it off. other places the back story showed. in alabama the up country representative just charged they were being run out of the union with that democracy was being completely violated. people in virginia looked tat and said no ordinary farmer has voted for this. they have run us out of the union without the consideration of democratic process. i think it's interesting it's revealing what democracy was and innocent a slave regime in 1860. they called it a democracy. they sometimes often made the case what they wanted was a republican and democracy was mob of course sei. it was part of the reason they wanted out of the union. they didn't like the direction it was going. they had to play the game to get
is to defeat the republicans in the midterm election, to just run on politics, tactically maneuver, defeat republicans, don't worry about the nation, and do what he wants to do in the final two years? >> i am for striking deals, if you watch that movie, lincoln, you're for striking deals -- i'm for cutting deals, but i'm not just for saying everybody should come together because here i am. >> but last night -- >> when you say be ruthless, if a republican, if a tea party member said be ruthless people would be screaming at you. >> what i think he should do -- >> anderson says -- >> well, i wasn't quoting, i was -- >> i'm sure i did use that word. that means it's not just saying come let's reason together. give them something, and then take something. do the grimy realistic -- sometimes unpleasant work of running the country. >> and this is the magic that the movie "lincoln" illustrated. the passage of the 13th amendment happened in a far more polarized congress than the current congress we have. if they can do anything -- president obama is not going to have a major legacy piece in terms of
elected officials. i won. i won. i am far less naive today than i was four years ago but far more certain today who i am and where i want to take this country over the next four years. basically, that's what that peach was. >> what's the practical fact, he talked about climate change. he won't pass cap and trade through the house. >> when i heard that line, what struck me is this is the obama-care of the second ad administration. climate change is the sleeping dog issue that he is going to be what he will fashion piecemeal. i think that will be part of the second term legacy what he gets done. not so much the social stuff a lot of people certainly in the conservative movement concern themselves with, the bigger idea that falls into that broader vision. he reformed one six of the nation's economy with health care. now, he will go to the next level with global change on the environment. i see that as a sleeper and agree it was a very progressive speech. the idea he's putting a period on the reagan period saying this is a new day, we're going a new way and these are the agenda items i will t
2012 election cycle. it's an opportunity to kind of reflect on american history and create a sense of unity. the most raccus was andrew jackson. when he got to the white house they were serving cider and people trashed the place. he slipped out the back of the executive mansion as it was called then and fled to alexandria and went to a tavern. he's tapped to be president. he took a barge to new york city and is sworn in. it's wrought with tradition. this is a time for the people to be glad that democracy works. the whole world is watching now. >> the longest inaugural was william henry harrison. >> he gave this long winded speech and got will. it was freezing weather. he died only a month later from his own inaugural. you don't want to be ranked below william henry harrison. >> what are you looking for tomorrow? >> most important is to have some kind of healing message. this is not a state of the union address. this is the president carefully reading lincoln's second inaugural, the poetry and language of it. i do think that barack obama, since the first one was historic for him, he
to washington, you already paid for it. well, this is the day they all voted for. and this country elected this president, elections matter, everyone who went to the polling place went to the trouble of getting involved in this campaign. it's getting the reality of it to come true today. i am curious, i know the president is committed to do something about public safety. we can see that in his heart since newtown. we know he wants to do something on immigration because the there to be fixed and both parties want to deal with it fur all kinds of reasons. i'm waiting to see if there's a halfton in his speech today, something about rebuilding this country. i think this president's instincts are good on war and peace. i hope they are good about building this country. i wish the labor unions and all kinds of people would get out to say, let's do what we did when eisenhower was president, a moderate republican. build this country up, rebuild our highways, our bridges, our big cities and transit systems, inner city transportation, really build up this country with jobs. all this talk about debt,
the election of the first african-american president. president obama is only the 16th sitting chief executive to be returned to office. he is the first president since dwight eisenhower to win two consecutive elections with more than 51% of the popular vote. he won for the 372 electoral votes to mitt romney's 206 and spent part of the morning at the white house having coffee with bipartisan leadership. >> this is the second time the president had his inauguration on the celebration of martin luther king, jr. and it's actually a ceremonial event. the 20th amendment to the constitution mandates that newly elected mandates take place on january 20th and several times that happened on the sunday. and followed by the pomp and pageantry on the following monday. >> both president obama and vice president biden took their official oaths of office why yesterday. >> i barack hussein obama swear -- >> supreme court justice john roberts swore in the first family. justice sotomayor did the honor at the vice president's residence at the united states naval observe tore in washington. >> and both families a
lincoln's election and a number of 1860 to his inauguration in march, 1861. during this time the president was pressured by republicans and democrats throughout the country to maintain the union. it's a little over an hour. >> welcome to the virtual book signing here at the abraham lincoln bookshop as always. i'm daniel weinberg and i am pleased to have you here. it is a lincoln civil war book signing at work. it's a wonderful way for you to build a first edition signed library with all of the books coming out over the next few years in the lincoln bicentennial which is upon us but also the war that follows the heels there are so many books coming out and we are going to try to weed through them and have the authors on the show so you can see the best research going and also you have to weed out others that you don't have to have always. there are too many books out there. >> i say that as a book dealer we adjust them for book signings and that is what distinguishes us. if you are watching live, we encourage you to do questions and we will try to get them on air and have them answered for
magnitude imperilled by the election to the presidency of an anti-slavery man by abraham lincoln, he meant, the people of the southern states were driven to the adoption of some course of action to avert the danger with which they were openly menaced. and that course of action, of course, was leaving the federal union. davis was not overstating the stakes for him if his fellow -- for him and his fellow slave owners, the more than 12 million souls who resided in the southern states in 1860. nearly one out of three of those people was enslaved, was owned outright by other people. and on the markets of the day, those nearly four million human beings were worth something like $3 billion. that was an immense sum at the time. it was a sum greater than the value of all the farmland in all the states of the south. it was a sum fully three times as great as the cost of constructing all the railroads that then ran throughout all the united states. to give you some idea of just what those human bodies were worth. but even more important to southern wealth than the sale price of these human bodies was
. and the most elite of the elite are the group who have been re-elected. >> mm-hmm. >> and so i think that this is their chance, this is obama's chance to really say put it out there and say this is -- the first time is really -- this is what i want to do, and the second time is, like, this is what i want to be. and i think that in a case of a black president it's even more important because the first time around it was jubilant, it was the first black president, it was so exciting. the second time around is this wasn't a fluke. this guy really did it. he did a good job, and the american people reaffirmed that he did a good job and re-elected him. and so many-in some way because he's a black president i think that the second inaugural for him is more important than the first. >> well, that is the reason for the second inaugural. let's go to nbc's peter alexander because peter was there for that d -- the more intimate inaugural, if you will, having been sworn in some 35 minutes ago, give us some details. >> reporter: alex, this ceremony lasted barely a minute, the president surrounded
, as well. this as you say was history. 16th president to win election to two consecutive terms and be sworn in. now, they have all the ceremonial swearings tomorrow. this more intimate friend in the blue room, family and close friends. amid all the constitutional moments there was also a light family moment where a dad got to talk to his daughter, take a listen. >> thank you sir. [ applause ] >> i did it. all right. thank you everybody. >> reporter: i did it, he said and sasha said you didn't mess up. vice president biden got to try this out first very early this morning. reason why it was so early is that just sotomayor had to get on to a train to go to new york city to sign her books. she was trying to get to barnes & noble this afternoon in new york city. >> gregg: you got to plug that book, that is more than the vice president of the united states. your publisher wants more book sales. [ laughter ] >> gregg: how might tomorrow's big speech by the president really set the tone and tenor for policy in his second term? >> reporter: very important. saw president bush try to do this in 2005
, working to desegregate the deep south. >> the fact that obama could be elected again shows that the stone of hope, it came out of the mountain of despair that king spoke of and there is hope. >> reporter: a sentiment likely shared by so many on the mall today, including the man they all came to see. cecilia vega, abc news, washington. >>> and here again, george stephanopoulos, great to spend the day with you. so, did anything happen today that changed the political possibilities? >> i don't think so. one day, one speech cannot dot that. even though this is the day where all of america comes together, and that was one of the big themes of the president's speech. but one of the things i did think we saw today was a very changed president. and this is a very different time and a very different president from the one who took office four years ago. the speech four years ago, a dark speech. for a dark time. we were mired in crisis. the economy beginning to come back. and what you saw today is, the president gave a meditation on freedom and equality. it was a president who else felt free. >> an
in the past election. host: on twitter -- james in dickinson, texas, democratic caller. caller: good morning. that was a great speech that the president and vice president spoke yesterday. i have been watching it ever since it came on. i want to say hello to my pastor at the baptist church. i'm sure he's listening, and to all the church members. host: a little bit more from president obama's speech yesterday, talking about defending democracy abroad. [video clip] >> we still believe that enduring security and lasting peace do not require perpetual war. [[cheers and applause] our brave men and women in uniform tempered by the flames of battle are unmatched in skill and courage. our citizens, feared by the memory of those we have lostthoseknow too well the price it has paid for liberty. the knowledge of their sacrifice will keep us forever vigilant against those who would do us harm. but we are also heirs to those who won the peace and not just the war. we have turned sworn enemies into the surest of friends and we must carry those lessons into this time as well. we will defend our people and
beginning for him because the first time around, he was elected based on what he promised to do. and this time around, he feels he was elected on what he has done and what he can do in the years to come. and there, you're looking, again, at the president's church. and, george, i wonder what you were thinking this morning when you woke up, about this day because it is a day that gives a president we know a chance to start again, for the country. >> everything stops. everything is new for at least a moment. and he has that clear shot to speak to the entire country. and it feels like the one day where the entire country has ears to hear what the president has to say, as well. >> and one we can show the world also listening. we can show the world that after a hard-fought election, a bruising time in congress, that we are still together in this country. and i believe we have jon karl, white house correspondent, with us. he is also there on the west side of the capitol. jon? >> reporter: diane, i'm here. the divisions, the president will be surrounded, of course, by family and friends
. the next two flags are the flags the u.s. adopted when the president elect's home state became part of the u.s. the middle flag represents the 50 states. president obama plus home state illinois entered the union and 18 -- in 1818, making it the 21st state to join the union. the two flags towards the center, they will display 21 stars. dole in new york, the independent line. -- joel in new york, the independent line. >> i love c-span. inauguration day is a proud day for every american, regardless of party affiliation. i want to address the first caller about poverty. i am a second-generation american, and if you cannot make in this country, you'll be doomed to failure in any other country. host: julie, salt lake city, good morning. caller: i want to thank you for taking my call. i lived in a completely republican state. thank goodness that president obama has prevailed, because i do believe that the majority of people, even though i do it in a republican state, a lot of them did vote for him. unfortunately, i wish we would get rid of the electoral vote and go to the popular vote. i
that got him e re-elected and the way he paid tribute today. >> he came up late in the civil rights movement and always said that he regretted that. this is what he finally proclaimed with such passion today. you can look at his life and doctor king and the rise of civil rights in a very personal way. the day barack obama was born, four civil rights workers were arrested in louisiana. on august 4th, the civil rights act was passed by the senate. so there's so much history that was sort of, you could see it in his face today, i think in a more profound way than even is first inaugural. >> well, he comes from an unusual background. he comes from an imgrant mother who left the scene, white mother, middle american mother raised in hawaii and raised again in indonesia. >> so he had to construct an identity where he discovered, constructed, i think, because it was a deliberate process. he wrote about it in dreams for my father, his first book, it's been written about by others. and the identity that he constructed is an african american man. he went into the community in chicago, he -- yo
of the world in this election in whh he did well with minorities and younger voters and so to the extent that his second election ratified the new obama coalition and the new shape of the electorate he so too hopes his second term will speak to that. >> rose: we conclude this evening with part one of a two-part conversation about the presidency of barack obama and the next four years joined by doris kearns goodwin, jon meacham, bob woodward, bob caro, and michael beschloss. >> i know it's the consensus that we're -- barack obama has to do is get along with the republicans. i'd like to say something about that. president obama is fond of quoting-- and if he isn't, i am-- martin luther king's statement "the moral arc of the universe bends slowly but it bends towards justice." in the first term, president obama did bend that moral arc. he got health insurance, peace of mind for more than 30 million people. the bill may be floored but it's passed. in the second term i see a sort of differently. everyone's attacking the moral arc of justice-- social security medicare everyone's saying we have
be more tkeufpbt it turned out t difficult it turned out to be. it was a narrow election. he has that ahead of him. not to mention the things that haunt a second term which none of us can imagine today. >> you can see former president clinton and secretary of state clinton. who is going to be testifying before congress in a less friendly atmosphere later this week. i was reading obama's first inaugural address today, because i thought, you know, let's get a sense of what it is that he said four years ago. i want to read you two lines. on this day we come to proclaim an end to the petty grievances and falls promises the recriminations and warn out doug mas that for far too long have strangled our politics. that is an incomplete at best. not all the president's fault but also counterparts on capitol hill. but we are still strangled by that kind of division. talking about national security and the global war on terror, we reject as false the choice between our safety and our ideals. that was part of the promise he was going to make to shut down guantanamo, to end enhanced interrogat
the video. we have 2014 coming up. we hope to elect many more women to the congress. if we did not have so many women in congress up till now, we would not have the first woman speaker of the house and. thank you to emily's list for that. listening to the shiloh baptist church choir and taking our lead from them, when i saw the video and heard them tell me that to 16, and our own hopes for two fourteen -- you ain't seen nothing yet. thank you, emily's list, for having women lead the way, for helping to change the playing field. a promise you this. but with emily's list is held, if we reduce the role of money and politics, overturn the citizens united and the rest, and increase the level of civility in politics, we will change the environment in which politics is conducted. we will elect many more women to public office. that is a very good thing for our country. thank you, emily's list. we are emily, and we ain't seen nothing yet. thank you all. [applause] >> a look at the jefferson memorial. president obama's public inauguration as tomorrow, which happens to be allocated. -- mlk day. [ind
. it was relatively easy it was unanimous that george washington had been elected president. the first thing they had to do was notify washington he needed to come to take his oath of office. it took a little while for presidents of the united states in those days to get to wherever the federal government was so they had a couple of weeks to work things out. well the first thing they did was to write an oath for everybody else to take including the vice president of the united states. congress write it is oath that every other person who works for the government from military to judges to the legislators. that is an oath written by congress and it's changed over the centuries. but the oath the president takes is unique. it's in the constitution and it's never changed. so the question was where are we going to swear in the president of the united states? well congress is meeting in federal hall on wall street. and it was a nice building. the house had the bigger room downstairs and the senate had the smaller room upstairs. and they said the president should be sworn in in our chamber. that was fine ex
in 1964. and if there had been no candidate goldwater in 1964, there would have been no president-elect ronald reagan in 1980. it was goldwater you see who approved reagan's famous a time for choosing television address which made reagan a political star overnight and led to his running for governor of california and eventually president of these united states. david recounts how bill rusher shored up the goldwater committee when money ran short and spirits sagged. skillfully guided young americans for freedom in its early chaotic days and in for some order of discipline on the spirit to read national review, expanded the conservative movement through the tv program the epic it's, his newspaper column and his lectures in champion ronald reagan when other conservatives were somewhat skeptical about the act there turned politician. bill rusher loved american politics, rare wines, traveling to distant lands and national review's effervescent editor bill buckley of whom he once said quote the most exasperating people in the world are so often the most beloved, and he is no exception. now da
. >> no law varying from the services of representatives shall take effect until the election of representatives -- you can't pass a law about your pay during that congress. >> with great respect to the congressman here, i'm not an elected official. what i hear him saying is we have a very difficult budget situation. and therefore, we have to go full speed into total dysfunction. and i just don't see how those pieces add up. i mean, if you're really serious about trying to do something about the deficit, which is a long-term problem, versus the economy. in fact, all that messing around with the debt ceiling, all that does is threaten to raise the interest rates, it makes things much worse. if you want to talk about stabilizing the debt, which i would hope you and i would agree would be a goal then we have to talk about raising $1.2 trillion over the next two years, because we have over a trillion in the bank through spending cuts and tax increases. that 1.2 trillion is not that heavy a lift with a functional congress. but we can't get there if we're playing around with this cr
by slaves and here we have transcended that moment by electing a black president. he has another bite of the apple h >> the moment was historic. how does he change the mood in this country? how can he change the mood of this country? >> it's interesting, because i first saw the poll numbers that you just put up on the screen and i thought, well you know what the economy is still bad there's 7.8% unemployment, underemployment is also skyrocketing. then my husband had to go look at the cross caps. >> i hate it when i look at that. >> toad look at the science. toad read the numbers. you had a great point. you did discover something that is noteworthy. >> if you break it down, the real news here is the polarization. i mean, 76% of democrats thing thinks are going very well. only 28% of republicans. just another reminder of how drunk we are on partisanship. >> that partisanship or is it that democrats are glass half-full and republicans are glass half-empty? >> marg is a great very glass half-full republican. >> reagan was a sunny optimist you can the eternal optimist. >> he was. it does s
program. president roosevelt was elected four terms. president obama got the virtue of january 20th landing on a sunday and chief justice roberts flubbing the oath in 2009. he used a note card yesterday. probably will use it today, shepard. shepard: justice sotomayor you saw. a funny story from last night. i flown in from turks and caicos for a quick vacation and taking a delta flight from kennedy. it was supposed to take off at 8:30. there were big mechanical problems. they were towing it from the gate. the toe bar got caught underneath the plane. it might have been me and my colleagues on the flight it might have stayed there. in front of me a lady was talking to the marshals as she called them if there was another way or train to get to washington. just happened it was justice sotomayor. someone from the plane said, your honor, we will get you there. and, indeed they did. justice sotomayor, to deliver the fourth inaugural swearing in today here at the capitol. doug mckelway, our correspondent from d.c. on the parade route from freedom plaza. how is the view there? >> reporter: sh
to do which is represent the people of the united states. we have a democratically elected republic and people need to pull out their history books and find out what that is and realize that when we send them to office, would give them the authority to vote the way we feel and if we feel they are not representing our opinions and needs, we need to replace them. thank you very much. host: stephen dinan will be joining us at the bottom of the hour. later, author and historian richard norton smith will dig in the details of the second term and what this president could be facing. this headline is from "the washington examiner" -- the public information officer for the u.s. capitol police is joining us on the fund. guest: for having me. host: we look at the seams around washington, what can visitors expect tomorrow? guest: they should expect that we will do our best to protect people. give time to get through lines and things of that nature. host: this is a map we found this morning in "the washington post." the area in red it will be the high-security area. many of the roads around the
in election in two years. >> this and other difficulties appeared miles away as mr. obama recited the constitutional oath that cemented the start of his new term. >> i did it. >> sasha was referring to the mix jum four years ago where the chief justice and the president said some of the words of the oath out of sequence prompting a do-over here at the white house a couple of hours later. as sasha said nobody messed up this time and as said a couple of moments ago, that's probably not too bad. >>> robert gibbs was an adviser to the obama campaign and served as the white house's first press secretary. welcome. >> thank you. >> you have seen it you have read it, characterize it. >> i think it's hopeful, and it talks about the values and the visions and the ideals that bring us to this very moment as america. you'll hear the president talk a lot about what we have to do in this country together to make progress on the big challenges that we face. and, look, it's not just -- one party can't solve these issues. not even just those in government can tackle these
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 81 (some duplicates have been removed)